Compost For Vegetable Garden Home Depot
Organic Fertilizer

Compost For Vegetable Garden Home Depot

  • November 13, 2021

[This story has been corrected to reflect that Walmart, Sam's Club and Target only provide food to EcoScraps.EcoScraps got started by knocking on the door of high-profile grocery stores and produce retailers and offering to pick up expired fruits and vegetables that would otherwise be sent to landfill."We realized we needed first to create demand for the finished product and work backwards from there," said Dan Blake, the 20-something entrepreneur who put his college degree on hold to found the two-year-old, Provo, Utah-based company with classmate Craig Martineau (now the EcoScraps vice president of finance).By linking with these organic waste producers in an increasing number of areas across the country, EcoScraps could be reducing some of the fragmentation in the U.S. composting business landscape.This summer, EcoScraps will grow beyond its roots in Utah and Arizona to launch a major expansion into Northern California.EcoScraps already has facilities in Orem, Utah, and Phoenix, Ariz., where it processes more than 24 tons of food on a daily basis.Its initial financing included $18,000 in Blake's personal savings and $20,000 won through a Brigham Young University business plan competition.As it expands in California, however, EcoScraps is seeking venture funding and is teaming with hauling and processing partners to build a presence more quickly, Blake said. .

Mulch Must-Knows

Mulch Must-Knows

Mulch Must-Knows

Keep these tips in mind as you’re planting your spring garden and throughout the entire year, especially if you decide to add any new beds or landscaping.Adding it to your planting bed will block light from reaching the soil, which keeps many kinds of weed seeds from sprouting.Over time, garden mulch types made from organic materials (those produced by or part of a living thing) break down and increase your soil's structure and fertility.This is especially true with compost used as a mulch because the nutrients in it will promote soil organisms and fuel plant growth.Plus, a layer of mulch can help fight climate change because covered soil holds onto carbon instead of releasing this greenhouse gas into the air.If you're mulching a large area of your yard for the first time and not just touching up a few garden beds, you might want to schedule a delivery from a bulk supplier. .

Does Home Depot sell chicken manure?

A: Poultry manure costs more because it has a higher analysis of primary nutrients.However, if you're buying manure primarily as a source of organic matter to improve soil structure, five bags of steer is preferable.Place the collected manure and bedding materials in a compost bin or a pile somewhere in your yard. .

All About Raised-Bed Gardens

All About Raised-Bed Gardens

All About Raised-Bed Gardens

Of course, you don’t need a raised bed to grow great-tasting produce—most any plot of flat ground that gets full sun will suffice for that.But gardening in a raised bed offers a number of advantages.Build the sides high enough and you can even garden while sitting.Raised-Bed Gardens.Seaman, who shares his gardening know-how online at Eartheasy.com, has been growing vegetables in raised beds for nearly 40 years.Choose a spot that gets at least 8 hours of sun a day, and orient each bed so its long side runs east to west.Choose a spot that gets at least 8 hours of sun a day, and orient each bed so its long side runs east to west.Beds built with western red cedar can last 10 to 15 years; galvanized steel, 20 years; masonry or plastic composites, indefinitely.Build a Raised Garden Bed from Scratch or a Kit.Or you could hire a mason to build one for you out of brick or stone.They’re held in place by aluminum corners coated with a tough, baked-on finish and are capped with western red cedar.HEIGHT: Low beds are less work to construct and fill, but require double digging to prep soil beneath the bed.High beds mean less digging and less stooping, but need more soil and building materials.How deep to make it?This organic matter helps retain water in sandy soil and improve drainage in clay soils.Choose Your Material: Wood.There’s more than one way to build a bed frame.Fitted together and held in place with dabs of construction adhesive, natural stone or look-alike cast-concrete blocks don’t need mortar or a footing, just a tamped crushed-stone base.Shown: 48-by-48-by-11-inch Raised Garden kit, $90; Vita.If you want an organic bed from the start, buy bagged soils and compost that are OMRI-Listed; they’ve been certified by the Organic Materials Review Institute.Hold them in place with netting so they don’t blow away.Do this 30 to 60 days before the first frost so the seeds have time to germinate.Shown: Fill the bed right to the top with soil; it will soon settle a few inches, leaving a lip to hold in the mulch.Design the Corners of Your Garden Bed.With prefab connectors, you can quickly build beds with your choice of wood or composite planks.Four Sided.This wood-plastic composite corner has grooves on all sides to join corners and side walls, and even to link up with other beds, no screws required.Shown: Stacking Bracket, $15; Frame It All.Hay (alfalfa or a grass) breaks down faster, enriching the soil; but avoid the fresh stuff used for animal feed—it contains weed seeds.Hay (alfalfa or a grass) breaks down faster, enriching the soil; but avoid the fresh stuff used for animal feed—it contains weed seeds.GRASS CLIPPINGS: They’re high in nitrogen and break down quickly, but apply them just 1 inch thick to prevent matting.SEAWEED: Rinsed of salt, this nutrient-rich material contains no weed seeds, acts as a natural fertilizer, and, once dry, stops slugs.Shown: Straw mulch keeps leaves and produce clean and dry.$49 for 100-foot kit; Dripdepot Drip line: The most efficient and longest-lasting irrigation option, it’s also the most expensive ($76 for 50-foot kit; Dripdepot).Quarter-inch lines are limited to 30-foot runs; ½-inch lines can go up to 200 feet.Quarter-inch lines are limited to 30-foot runs; ½-inch lines can go up to 200 feet.Leave the panels’ top edge exposed so roots can’t grow over it.Enclose your vegetable garden with a fence at least 3 feet tall and 3 feet from your beds.A slanted 8-wire fence, like that sold by Gallagher, is only 4 ½ feet high but 6 feet deep.A grid-style trellis attached to a raised bed provides the support that peas and beans need as they climb toward the sun.Mount the trellis on the bed’s north side, so it doesn’t shade the other plants, and leave enough space between the strings or wires—at least 5 inches—so you can reach in and harvest the ripe pods from the back side.Raised Garden Bed Inspiration.The 20-inch-high walls of this U-shaped, western red cedar kit-built bed put plants within easy reach.Shown: 8-by-8-foot Raised Garden-Bed Kit with Deer Fence, $1,849; Outdoor Living Today.Materials cost for a 4-by-12-foot bed similar to shown: about $375.You can stack the finished frames as high as you like.Shown: two of The Farmstead’s 24-by-72-by-8-inch raised garden bed kits, $100 each; Garden Raised Beds. .

Tips and Tricks for Shopping The Home Depot Garden Center

Tips and Tricks for Shopping The Home Depot Garden Center

Tips and Tricks for Shopping The Home Depot Garden Center

Get started by checking out the Home Depot Garden Center near you.Following a few helpful tips, you can make sure your garden grows strong and healthy while using eco-friendly techniques to manage pests, increase soil quality, and choose the best seeds and grow kits.With that in mind, we’ve put together a quick guide to shopping at your local Home Depot Garden Center.If you’ve been slacking on yard maintenance, you probably have more than a few projects on your hands.The type of work you’ll be doing in your garden and flower beds depends on what time of year it is.Pick out any weeds and mix in some compost, but give the soil time to balance out.Whether you want to nurture a blossoming flower garden or thriving vegetable patch, you’ll see your garden grow and take shape with some effort and care.You’ll also want to think about how much room they’ll need to grow.Make the process easier with this genius garden hack:.When you’ve got your heart set on a fruit or vegetable garden, consider raised garden beds.Raised beds can make it easier to have a healthy garden and even extend your growing season.You could also try an aquaponic or hydroponic water garden for a super low-maintenance option.Create Your Sanctuary With the Home Depot Garden Center (and Back to the Roots).Take the stress out of yard work and get started on your home improvement projects by picking up the right gardening tools for the job. .

Miracle-Gro All Purpose Garden Soil Just $1.98 at Home Depot

Miracle-Gro All Purpose Garden Soil Just $1.98 at Home Depot

Miracle-Gro All Purpose Garden Soil Just $1.98 at Home Depot

Hip2Save may earn a small commission via affiliate links in this post.Through April 18th, head to The Home Depot where you can score Miracle-Gro All Purpose Garden Soil for just $1.98 (regularly $4.27)!This garden soil contains essential nutrients that plants need and continues to feed them for up to 3 months! .

Are cinder blocks OK for vegetable gardens? Answers to that & other

Are cinder blocks OK for vegetable gardens? Answers to that & other

Are cinder blocks OK for vegetable gardens? Answers to that & other

He found universities recommending the use of concrete blocks in container gardens or raised beds.The concern cited in many warnings is specifically fly ash, the residue you get from burning coal, that might have been used in older cinder blocks, but he doubts whether that is commonly used anymore.“Connie, you and Farfaglia are wrong – fly ash is still used in manufacturing ‘cinder’ blocks, sometimes.“I take that to mean that sometimes they have to put fly ash in a batch because it is requested by a builder, and to keep costs down, assuming the builder does not want to buy the whole batch, they have to sell the remainder to home depot and other retailers so the block you buy at a retailer like home depot might have fly ash in it.Naturally rot-resistant wood like cedar or redwood is the best choice for raised bed construction for gardeners that have concerns regarding any possibility of exposure of chemicals in the building materials.Fly ash is a byproduct of burning coal and so contains heavy metals and other hazardous waste.The risk of using new treated lumber is low, but he still recommends using natural wood such as cedar to be safe.“In a lot of cases the risk is not high, but as a general practice, save that strip for ornamental plants,” he said.That area can contain residues from salt and other chemicals used on the road, and there may be a higher concentration of lead still there from auto exhaust.You should also be wary of beds near the foundation of an older home that may be contaminated with lead from paint that flaked off and accumulated in the soil, he noted.How big the risk is depends on many factors, including how high the concentration of the contaminant is, how often you eat the food and how you cook it. .

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