Converting Liquid Fertilizer To Pounds
Liquid Fertilizer

Converting Liquid Fertilizer To Pounds

  • November 2, 2021

As we start to dust off the jugs on our liquid fertility shelves, I start to get questions from end users and reps about label math.Now would be an ideal time to walk through calculating pounds of nutrient supplied by liquid fertilizers.This number can usually be found at the bottom of a jug of product or on the label.With the Foliar Pak 11-0-11, the product weight per gallon is 10.4 lbs.For our example, we’d take the product weight per gallon (10.4 lbs) and multiply it by the percent of our nutrient (both N and K are 11% or 0.11).We are applying at 6 oz/1000, but if I know how much nutrient is in an ounce, then I have great information if I wanted to pivot my rate up or down.Again, knowing how many lbs of nutrient are in each ounce gives us complete and easy control to adjust a rate on the fly.We would simply multiply the .0089 lbs N (and K) per ounce by whatever rate we wanted to apply the product. .

Liquid Fertilizer Calculations

Liquid Fertilizer Calculations

Liquid Fertilizer Calculations

To calculate how much liquid fertilizer you need to apply to deliver some number of pounds of Nitrogen to a field you need to know:.Gallons of fertilizer required to deliver desired amount of Nitrogen to one acre (F) = C / E.N/gallon = 14.03 gallons of product per acre required to deliver 15 lbs.• 280.6 gallons of fertilizer required to fertilize entire field.To determine how much Nitrogen was actually applied to a field, the calculations are similar.In the example above, 280.6 gallons of fertilizer were required to hit the desired target of 15 lbs.So how many pounds of Nitrogen were actually delivered per acre if 300 gallons of fertilizer were applied instead of 280.6?• Gallons of fertilizer applied per acre (I) = H / D.• 300 gallons of fertilizer applied to 20 acres = 15 gallons of fertilizer applied per acre. .

Calculating Liquid Fertilizer Rates Question

Calculating Liquid Fertilizer Rates Question

Calculating Liquid Fertilizer Rates Question

Calculating liquid fertilizer rates is confusing for many but still a necessary task when using any fertilizer including the best liquid lawn fertilizer.This page originates from a question I received on how to measure the liquid fertilizer for a 40 gallon sprayer to cover 2 acres.For properly calculating liquid fertilizer rates you will need to go through a series of math problems to get the information needed to determine how much of the product to apply per 1000 sq.There are 43560 sq ft in an acre.We will calculate it based on 1/3 lbs of N per 1000 sq.* The next step is to determine this: if one gallon contains 1.9 lbs of N, how much of one gallon applied to 1000 sq.* To determine the amount of product to deliver .33 lbs of Nitrogen per 1000 sq ft. - divide .33 lb N / 1.9 lbs of N per gallon = .174 or rounded down to .17 gallons of product.This equals the Growth Products label of 22 ounces to deliver 1/3 lb of N.For an example, if you have a 50 gallon sprayer you will want to spray 22 ounces of product plus water to equal 2 gallons over a 1000 sq ft. To cover a whole acre of grass it would be approximately 860 ounces of product to cover 43000 sq ft.For calculating liquid fertilizer rates over an acre, multiply 34 (ounces for 1/2 lb of N) X 43 to get 1462 ounces (over 11 gallons) of product plus water to make 2 gallons of solution for each 1000 sq.A 40 gallon tank at 2 gallons per 1000 sq ft would cover 20000 sq. .

Nitrogen Math: Simple Calculations Give You the Right Rates

Nitrogen Math: Simple Calculations Give You the Right Rates

Nitrogen Math: Simple Calculations Give You the Right Rates

How much nitrogen to apply on corn?Gone is the day when we could use the old Iowa State approach of 1.2 pounds per bushel expected yield and take a credit for soybeans (1 pound per bushel soybean yield ) if in a corn/soybean rotation.Today's corn hybrids also are much more nitrogen efficient, and continuous corn is common.We see rates of 0.9 to 1.0 pound per bushel and some farmers are even pushing it to 0.7 to 0.8 pound per bushel yield goal. .

Fertilizer Reckoning for the Mathematically Challenged (Purdue Univ.)

Relative nutrient costs play an important role in the fertilizer selection process.Rather, they are examples of guaranteed analysis values for the percentages of nitrogen (N), available phosphorus (P 2 O 5 ) and water-soluble potassium (K 2 O) in common fertilizer sources.These values represent plant-available nutrients and are required by law to be publicly available when you purchase fertilizers in Indiana.Fertilizer sources and retail prices used for this example are anhydrous ammonia ($285/ton) and 28% UAN ($225/ton).Calculating the price per pound of nutrient for multiple analysis fertilizer products can be more challenging.For example, let’s say that you wanted to compare the relative nitrogen costs of 28% UAN (28-0-0) and 10-34-0 for making an economic decision on starter fertilizer products.The simplest value would be that equal to the price per lb of P 2 O 5 in a common single nutrient source such as 0-46-0 (triple super phosphate).So, remember to finish this mathematical exercise by calculating the per acre cost for the two products.So, while 10-34-0 is technically the cheaper source of nitrogen (per lb N) in this example, the total cost per acre would be greater than that for using 28% UAN as a starter fertilizer source because of the additional costs due to the phosphorus component of 10-34-0.However, IF the phosphorus soil test levels were above the critical value for corn (greater than 30 lbs P per acre, Bray P 1 ), then the inclusion of the phosphorus in the starter mix may be of little value to the corn crop and, thus, the less expensive starter N source of 28% UAN would be the economic choice.Assume you wanted to calculate the nitrogen share of the cost of a 9-18-9 liquid fertilizer.Example 3: Multiple Nutrient Solution Products (N, P, & K) First, calculate the standard cost per lb of P 2 O 5 and K 2 O: Pounds of P 2 O 5 per ton of 0-46-0 = 2000 x 46% = 920 lbs of P 2 O 5.Second, calculate the lbs per gallon of 9-18-9 for the nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium nutrient components of this fertilizer product.These examples provide you with some guidelines to follow in order to calculate nutrient costs on a per pound basis.Working with multiple nutrient sources is somewhat more complicated, yet also fairly straightforward if you follow the steps.Remember that most fertilizer products are equally effective in their use as crop plant nutrient sources.Part of your decision process for fertilizer inputs involves calculating and comparing the relative costs among alternative products.Past articles by RL (Bob) Nielsen may be found at the CNN Archives at http://www.kingcorn.org/news/index-cnn.html.It is the policy of the Purdue Agronomy Department that all persons shall have equal opportunity and access to its programs and facilities without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, or disability. .

Understanding fertilizer numbers – Ohio Ag Net

Understanding fertilizer numbers – Ohio Ag Net

Understanding fertilizer numbers – Ohio Ag Net

Some fertilizers have more than three numbers, and in those cases the extra numbers represent other nutrients.This goes back in time to when fertilizers were heated with air to convert the phosphate and potassium to oxides — specifically P 2 O 5 and K 2 O — and these numbers were used for the nutrient analysis.One hundred pounds of 18-46-0 dry fertilizer has 18 pounds of total nitrogen (0.18 x 100 pounds), 46 pounds of available phosphate (0.46 x 100 pounds) and 0 pounds of soluble potash (0 x 100 pounds).Since the blend is half of each fertilizer product, the new analysis is 0.5 times the analysis numbers.According to the label, this product weighs 11.2 pound per gallon.By multiplying the nutrient percentages (9% nitrogen, 24% phosphate and 3% potash) by this weight we find that each gallon contains: 1 pound of nitrogen, 2.7 pounds of phosphate and 0.3 pound of potash.For blends of liquids, let us do the math for one gallon of the blend.Since the blend is 75% 9-24-3, it is necessary to multiply the amounts of nutrients in a gallon of the product times 75%.Now we will do the same for the other product in the blend, which is 20-0-0.The blended product is 25% 20-0-0.The weight of this product in the 25% blended product is 2.6325 pounds (0.25 x 10.53).So the new blended product would have an analysis of 12-18-2.To figure actual pounds per acre applied: multiply the number of gallons per acre times the weight per gallon (in this case 11.035) to get pounds per acre of product applied. .

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