What Is Organic And Inorganic Fertilizers
Inorganic Fertilizer

What Is Organic And Inorganic Fertilizers

  • October 30, 2021

Both organic and inorganic fertilizers provide plants with the nutrients needed to grow healthy and strong.Fertilizers supplement the soil with macronutrients needed in large amounts: nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium.Organic fertilizers contain only plant- or animal-based materials that are either a byproduct or end product of naturally occurring processes, such as manures, leaves, and compost.Organic fertilizers release nutrients only when the soil is warm and moist, which tends to correspond with your plants’ times of greatest need.The nutrients and exact elements available from an organic fertilizer, such as manure or compost, can only be guessed at without laboratory testing.Heavy applications can burn your plants and build up toxic salt concentrations in the soil, which can create chemical imbalances. .

Effects of biochar compared to organic and inorganic fertilizers on

Effects of biochar compared to organic and inorganic fertilizers on

Effects of biochar compared to organic and inorganic fertilizers on

biochar addition to mineral fertilizer significantly increased plant growth compared to mineral fertilizer alone.biochar and compost additions significantly increased total organic C content during the two growth periods.The overall plant growth and soil fertility decreased in the order compost > biochar + compost > mineral fertilizer + biochar > mineral fertilizer > control. .

Effect of long-term combined application of organic and inorganic

Effect of long-term combined application of organic and inorganic

Effect of long-term combined application of organic and inorganic

In comparison with treatments without crop residue application, straw incorporation improves soil hydrological properties19, such as water-holding capacity20, which results in higher water content in soils21.Furthermore, lignin and cellulose derived from maize straw forms organic cementing material to increase soil aggregate stability22,23.This observation was consistent with the studies of Xie et al.26 and Lichter et al.27, who demonstrated that both manure application and residue incorporation increase soil organic carbon in macroaggregates.In our study, significantly positive relationships between total nematodes and soil microbial biomass were found in the manure and straw incorporation treatments (P < 0.05).Therefore, the increase in microbial biomass likely led to the higher total nematode abundance within all aggregates in NPKS and NPKM treatments.Fungal hyphae and plant roots that remain in soils bind microaggregates into macroaggregates, which may offer more feeding spaces and resources for plant-parasites23.In comparison with NPKS, greater values of structure index within >1 mm aggregates in CK indicated that the soil food web was a relatively complex community with few disturbances within larger aggregates34.In the present study, both manure application and straw incorporation increased soil nematode functional metabolic footprints within all aggregates (Fig.In this research, the tendency of nematode functional metabolic footprints within >1 mm aggregates in NPK, NPKM and NPKS to move from quadrant C to quadrant D indicated that the soil disturbance caused by fertilization practices likely strongly affected the soil food web, particularly within larger aggregates.In the present study, among the environmental factors, the C/N ratio had the strongest effect on the soil nematode community within aggregates (Fig.Therefore, we inferred that the increasing abundance of Pratylenchus and Pratylenchoides might be related to the weakened suppressive effects induced by the decrease in soil pH.The accumulation of total nitrogen within <1 mm aggregates under straw incorporation treatment might play an important role in maintaining the survival of soil nematodes.Organic inputs such as manure application or straw incorporation increased the nematode functional metabolic footprints within all aggregates. .

Differences between organic and inorganic fertilizers

Differences between organic and inorganic fertilizers

Differences between organic and inorganic fertilizers

Any material that supplies plants with the essential nutrients required for growth as well as optimal yield is known as a fertilizer.There are some important differences between organic and inorganic fertilizers in terms of their properties, applications and effectiveness.To begin with, organic fertilizers offer a very feasible option as they are available on or near the farm at little or no cost at all.For example, if a farmer has livestock, then livestock manure can also be used as a fertilizer and that is free of cost.As for inorganic fertilizers, the costs of labour, transportation, handling and the opportunity cost of the land being used for producing them make them very costly.Fertilizer use and application is labour intensive for organic but not so for inorganic fertilizers.The application is usually by hands.The inorganic fertilizers immediately release nutrients that are required by the crops.Organic fertilizers-natural materials that originate from plants or animals; inorganic fertilizers-also known as mineral fertilizers, come from mining of mineral deposits; need some processing; can also be manufactured industrially through chemical processes, for example urea. .

Wheat Management in Warm Environments: Effect of Organic and

Wheat Management in Warm Environments: Effect of Organic and

Wheat Management in Warm Environments: Effect of Organic and

Wheat, which is one of the most broadly adapted cereal crops, is cultivated on about 7 million ha in the subtropics under continual heat stress, defined as having a mean daily temperature greater than 17.5°C in the coolest month of the cycle (Fischer and Byerlee, 1991).If growth resources are limited under heat stress, then the size of plant organs such as leaves, tillers, and spikes is reduced (Fischer, 1984).The apparent sensitivity of metabolic processes to heat stress in the field environment (Reynolds et al., 1998), coupled with the reduced length of life cycle at high temperature (Midmore et al., 1984), explains why grain yield is strongly associated with total plant biomass in hot environments (Reynolds et al., 1994a).These interactions make crop management factors critical to sustaining wheat yields in warm environments.Under high-temperature conditions, volatilization of N fertilizers such as NH 3 is more likely, and further decreases wheat yield compared with the application of equivalent N in organic forms such as FYM (Tran-Thuc-Son et al., 1995).Straw mulch is another agronomic input with the potential to ameliorate stress by reducing evaporation of moisture from the soil and increasing infiltration rate (Lal, 1975).It has also been reported to lower soil temperature (Benoit and Kirkhoun, 1963), while a negative consequence can be to impede seedling emergence (Chopra and Chaudhary, 1980).The present study was conducted to provide information from warm environments on the response of wheat to such management factors (i.e. mulching and application of FYM) and, in addition, to elevated levels of inorganic fertilizer and increased irrigation frequency.Objectives were as follows: (i) determine whether modifications to recommended crop management practices can significantly improve grain yield; (ii) measure crop establishment and other morphological and physiological traits with a view to understanding the basis of improved performance, as well as identifying potentially useful diagnostic plant traits; and (iii) identify management practices that might be implemented to maximize wheat yields in hot growing environments.Soil at the Dinajpur, Bangladesh, site was a noncalcareous piedmont alluvium (Tista flood plain) up to 3 m deep.At the Tlaltizap a ´ n site in Mexico the soil was a calcareous Vertisol (isothermic Udic Pellustert) with a rooting depth of about 30 to 40 cm.Soil properties in the 0- to 30-cm depth were pH of 7.5 to 7.6, organic matter of 1.75 to 2.55%, total Kjeldahl N of 0.107 to 0.138 g kg−1, available Olsen P of 2.4 to 6.9 mg kg−1, and exchangeable K of 0.11 to 0.13 cmol c kg−1.The mulch treatment was the same at all locations, and consisted of an application of chopped straw at 2.5 t ha−1, spread evenly over the surface of plots immediately after sowing.The effect of soil temperature was avoided by holding the infrared thermometer at an appropriate angle and distance from the plot and where it could view 100% of the crop canopy.Chlorophyll content and interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was measured at GS 65 (anthesis) during the spring-sown growing cycle at Tlaltizap a ´ n, 1990–1991. .

Impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the yield and quality of

Impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the yield and quality of

Impact of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the yield and quality of

It seems that silage yield and quality are not reduced by intercropping even when NPK fertilizer application levels are reduced.BNF can contribute to corn growth and yield by direct fixation within the corn plants or through the use of legume plants as crops either in rotation or intercropped with corn.Compared with those in response to 100% CM and 100% NPK applications, the ARA rates in response to BF applications in the soybean roots responded well ( P < 0.05).However, significant differences were not observed between the 100% NPK and 100% CM treatments ( P < 0.05), while the control treatment yielded a significantly higher ARA value (28.12 nmol/h) than did the lone chemical and CM fertilizers.However, no significant differences were observed between the 100% NPK and 100% CM fertilizer treatments ( P < 0.05), while the control treatment yielded a significantly higher ARA rate (7.63 nmol/h) than did the lone chemical and CM fertilizer treatments ( Fig.The chemical fertilizers, CM, and BF as well as their combinations did not significantly affect the pH, which ranged from 4.02 to 4.03.In addition, the different fertilizer application treatments did not significantly affect the silage DM, which ranged from 32.24% to 32.78%.No significant response of silage lactic acid and ammonia-N contents to BF application combined with CM was observed.Silage lactic acid and ammonia-N contents resulting from 100% NPK were significantly higher than those resulting from 50% NPK.Compared with the control treatment, the combination of NPK, organic manure and BF treatment resulted in increased silage lactic acid and ammonia-N contents, but those contents were similar to those resulting from the 50% NPK+50% CM and 100% NPK treatments.No significant response of silage lactic acid and ammonia-N contents to BF application combined with chemical fertilizer was observed.Integration of NPK and CM increased mixed silage lactic acid and ammonia-N concentrations to the same levels as those resulting from chemical fertilizer.The combination of chemical fertilizer and CM increased lactic acid and ammonia-N contents to the same levels as those resulting from CM fertilizer.The corn-soybean forage CP yield in response to 100% NPK fertilizer application (2,009.98 kg/ha) was significantly higher than the CP yield in response to 50% NPK fertilizer application (1,288.39 kg/ha).The results showed that application of 50% NPK fertilizer or 50% CM fertilizer alone could not fulfill the nutrient requirements of plants with respect to CP yield production.Compared with the control treatment, the combination of organic manure, chemical and BF treatment resulted in increased forage CP yields, but the values were similar to those resulting from the 100% NPK and 50% NPK+50% CM treatments.No significant response of forage CP yield to BF application combined with NPK was observed.Integration of chemical fertilizer and CM increased the mixed forage CP yield to the same level as that in response to the chemical fertilizer alone.Application of 50% NPK+50% CM fertilizer resulted in higher CP yields (1,991.95 kg/ha) than did application of 100% CM fertilizer (1,408.95 kg/ha).Among the one fertilizer applications, the mean CP yield was not significantly different between the 100% NPK (2,009.98 kg/ha) and 100% CM (1,408.95 kg/ha) applications, but those values were significantly higher than those resulting from BF applications (894.25 kg/ha).Compared with the control treatment, the combination of chemical, organic manure and BF treatment resulted in lower NDF and ADF concentrations, but those concentrations were similar to those resulting from the 100% CM and 50% NPK+50% CM treatments.Similarly, the ADF content was not significantly different between the 100% NPK (35.68%) and BF (36.09%) fertilizer applications, but those ADF contents were significantly higher than that resulting from the 100% CM fertilizer application (26.66%).The results showed that application of 50% NPK fertilizer or 50% CM fertilizer alone could not improve mixed forage quality because of the CP concentration.Compared with the control treatment, the integration of BF, organic manure and chemical fertilizer treatment resulted in increased forage CP concentration, but the concentration was similar to that resulting from the 50% NPK+50% CM and 100% NPK application treatments.Similarly, no significant response of forage CP content to BF application was observed when combined with CM.The combination of chemical fertilizer and CM increased the mixed forage CP concentration to the same level as that in response to the chemical fertilizer alone.The combination of NPK and CM fertilizers increased the corn and soybean LAI to the same level as that resulting from the NPK fertilizer alone.The corn and soybean LAI in response to the combined application of NPK and CM was significantly higher than that in response to application of 100% CM.Compared with the control treatment, the combination of BF, organic manure and chemical fertilizer treatment resulted in an increase in corn and soybean LAI, but the value was similar to that resulting from the 100% NPK and 50% NPK+50% CM treatments.The results showed that, compared with those in response to 100% CM, the CGR values of both crops in response to combined applications of NPK and CM were significantly higher.Corn and soybean crop growth rates (CGRs) and the LAI in response to all fertilizer treatments were significantly higher than those in response to the control treatment ( P < 0.01).The integration of chemical fertilizer with CM increased corn and soybean plant heights to the same level as the heights in response to the inorganic fertilizer alone.Additionally, fertilizer treatments of 50% NPK+50% CM resulted in the same soybean plant heights (112.75 cm) as those resulting from the treatment of 100% NPK.Compared with that in response to 100% CM, the plant height of corn and soybean in response to combined applications of chemical fertilizers and CM was significantly taller.Among the lone fertilizers, compared with 100% CM (184 cm), 100% NPK resulted in significantly taller corn plants (197 cm); the plants were also significantly taller than those resulting from the BF (152.50 cm) treatment.No significant response of forage DM yield to BF application was observed for the combination of NPK and CM.The DM yield from 100% NPK fertilizer application was significantly higher than that from 50% NPK fertilizer application.Similarly, the application of 100% CM fertilizer resulted in a significantly higher DM yield (9.74 t/ha) than did the application of 50% CM fertilizer (6.75 t/ha).Compared with the control treatment, the combination of organic manure, chemicals and BF treatment resulted in higher forage DM yields, but the DM yields were similar to those resulting from the 100% NPK and the 50% NPK+50% CM treatments.Corn and soybean yields were higher than those of the control in all fertilizer treatments ( P < 0.01).Among the three lone fertilizers, the 100% NPK fertilizer application resulted in significantly higher total forage DM yield (13.86 t/ha) than did the 100% CM fertilizer (9.74 t/ha) application, which was also significantly higher than that resulting from the BF (6.72 t/ha) application.The results showed that application of 100% NPK fertilizer was best in terms of yield and quality of the mixed forage of corn and soybean and was better than the 100% CM fertilizer.The growth of corn plants in response to combinations of chemical+organic fertilizers and lone inorganic fertilizers was comparable because nutrients were released early from the inorganic fertilizer, and corn, which is an aggressive feeder, was able to use those nutrients for growth.Although the rate of application of inorganic fertilizer was reduced in the combined use, complementation with nutrients from organic manure made possible yields that were comparable to those resulting from inorganic fertilizer applications alone.CM is also a rich source of nutrients that help improve crop yields; lower yields resulting from CM rather than from chemical fertilizer might be due to the slow release of nutrients.In addition to supplying nutrients, organic manure also improves soil structure.The optimum yield obtained was partly attributable to the integration of organic and inorganic fertilizers: nutrients were released from chemical fertilizers, and corn was able to use those nutrients for growth, which was supplemented by necessary nutrients released from the decomposition of added organic manure.Compared with chemical fertilizers, lone organic fertilizers or BFs do not meet the nutritional needs of crops because they contain a comparatively less quantity of nutrients.The results of this study showed that the DM yield from the combination of inorganic and organic fertilizers was higher than that from the lone application of organic fertilizer or BF.Makinde, Agboola & Oluwatoyinbo (2001) indicated that corn performance resulting from chemical fertilizer applications alone and a mixture of organic and inorganic fertilizer applications was significantly higher than that resulting from organic fertilizer application alone.In the present study, the results showed that BF application did not significantly increase the DM yield of forage.Compared with applications of combined NPK and CM fertilizers, applications of BF did not significantly increase DM yields.BFs are different from chemical fertilizers and organic manure with respect to their effects on crop productivity.BFs maintain or increase soil microbial complexes by the slow release of mineral nutrients from organic matter over a long period of time; BFs do not directly supply any nutrients to crops.BFs are comparatively low in nutrient content, so a larger volume is needed to provide enough nutrients for crop growth (Chen, 2006; Carvajal-Muñoz & Carmona-Garcia, 2012).Compared with those in response to applications of lone BF and control treatments, forage DM yield and protein yield in response to 100% NPK, CM alone and NPK and CM combination treatments increased.These results were in agreement with the findings of Abbasi, Rouzbehan & Rezaei (2012), who reported that, compared with those in response to no fertilizer applications, corn-amaranth forage yield and the concentration of CP in response to fertilizer applications significantly increased.In the present study, organic manure fertilizer significantly reduced the NDF concentration, and compared with the other treatments, the 100% CM and CM combined with NPK or BF treatments yielded lower NDF and ADF concentrations. .

Effects of organic and inorganic fertilizers on growth, activity of

Parameters observed were plant height, number of leaves, activity of nitrate reductase (ANR) and chlorophyll contents.Cow manure and NPK 16 affected on increasing of plant height, ANR and total chlorophyll contents of peanuts. .

Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers

Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers

Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers

A visit down the fertilizer aisle in your garden center can leave you scratching your head in confusion.With so many numbers to consider -- different formulations, ratios, grades and application rates -- you may decide you need a degree in math to figure things out.Then, as you consider the different nutrients listed on the package -- elements like nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and iron -- you strain to remember even a cursory knowledge of high-school science classes.If you broadcast a randomly chosen fertilizer on your lawn, in your flower beds or vegetable garden, you may be wasting money on nutrients that your particular plants don't need; or even worse, you may do more harm than good by providing excessive fertilization that can burn -- or even kill -- your plants.And the misconception that organic fertilizers can't harm your plants can lead to disastrous results.Based on our soil-test recommendations, your next decision is whether to use an organic or inorganic fertilizer to provide the needed nutrients.The Grounds Guys can help you determine the suitability of both types of fertilizer to meet your overall landscape goals.Whether your fertilizer goal is simply to create a lush, green, healthy lawn, or whether you desire a multi-faceted landscape with borders, beds and islands, The Grounds Guys can help.Starting with the preliminary work of soil testing to choosing suitable organic or inorganic fertilizers and then applying them properly, we'll make sure your yard receives the utmost of care. .

Review on: The Effect of Mixing Organic and Inorganic Fertilizer on

The use of inorganic or organic fertilizer alone has both positive and negative effects on plant growth, nutrient availa-bility and the soil.Organic fertilizer improves physical and biological activities of soil but they have comparatively low in nutrient content, so larger quantity is required for plant growth.So the integrated nutrient management system is an alternative system for the sustainable and cost-effective management of soil fertility by combined apply of inorganic with organic materials resulting in rising soil fertility and productivity without affecting environment.The sustainable crop cultivation needs appropriate treatment of nutrient resources and conservation of soil fertility.Organic fertilizers are natural materials of either plant or animal source, including livestock manure, green manures, crop residues, household waste, compost, and works directly as a source of plant nutrients and indirectly influences the physical, biological and chemical properties of soil [18] [19] .Nutrients like nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus are removed by livestock through grazing and crop residue collection.However, the manure is not allowed to recycle back to the farming and grazing lands, due to its alternative uses as fuel.Due to this recently farmers put an emphasis on chemical fertilizer application in order to increase the productivity [19] .Correct amount applications of inorganic fertilizer can increase soil organic matter through higher levels of root mass and crop residues [8] [24] [26] [28] .Over-application can result in negative effects such as leaching, pollution of water, acidification and reduces the availability of the trace element or alkalization of the soil.However, the opposite strategy, the use of inorganic fertilizers alone may lead to high crop yields in the short period of time.Also conducted that the integrated use of poultry manure along with NPK fertilizer was more successful in rising nutrient availability and maize yield than sole application of any of the fertilizer materials on sandy soil, loam texture with high proportion of coarse sand (84%).Finding of several researchers showed that integrated use of chemical and organic fertilizer has proved to be significantly increases maize productivity [36] [37] [38] .[15] carried out an experiment on the “Combined Effect of Organic Manures and Inorganic Fertilizers on the Growth and Yield of Hybrid Rice”.The result showed that the integrated application of organic manures with inorganic fertilizers was effective in enhancing growth and yield of hybrid rice.These outcomes have the great potential for reducing the use of chemical fertilizers without decreasing the yield of hybrid rice [39] Conducted research on the “Effects of Integrated use of Organic and Inorganic Fertilizers on Soil Properties Performance, using Rice (Oryza sativa L.)”.Similarly, many authors have suggested that rice productivity was significantly raised by the combined application of organic with inorganic fertilizes [9] [23] [41] .[42] conducted research on the “Evaluation of Synergistic Effect Organic and Inorganic Fertilizing System on Grain Yield of Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at Southern Tigray, Northern Ethiopia”.Several investigators have concluded that combined use inorganic fertilizer with organic materials perform better in terms of improving productivity and yields of wheat [20] [35] [45] .A study by [46] showed that the use of mixed NPK fertilizer along with poultry manure was more effective for tomato cultivation.Similarly [47] reported that the mixed use of organic with inorganic fertilizers significantly (p ≤ 0.05) increased total number of collected tomato and weight of harvest.[48] conducted an experiment on the “Effect of compost and inorganic fertilizers on yield and quality of tomato” the result showed the yield and quality parameters of tomato fruit increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05) by mixed use of compost with inorganic fertilizers.Similar type findings was reported by [50] that the incorporated nutrient management system results in rising organic carbon content, available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium increasing from 0.390% to 0.543%, 171.7 to 219.3 kg・ha−1 and 20.5 to 43.3 kg・ha−1 respectively.This review showed that, continuous cultivation and low nutrient application are the main reason of declining soil fertility.In various cases, the loss of organic matter results in reducing physical, biological and functional properties of soil.Organic fertilizer improves physical, biological, and chemical properties of a soil but the nutrients may not be as readily available to the plants. .

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