How Dangerous Is Lawn Fertilizer
Chemical Fertilizer

How Dangerous Is Lawn Fertilizer

  • November 3, 2021

Lawn Chemicals Can Be Toxic.One easy way to determine whether a particular lawn chemical is likely to be toxic is to look for "signal" words on the label.Try to use chemicals as little as possible.When they are used, do it safely or hire a licensed pesticide applicator.Look for the EPA's Safer Product label when you choose lawn products.when you choose lawn products. .

Grass Is Always Greener on the Other Side, but How Safe Is It

Grass Is Always Greener on the Other Side, but How Safe Is It

Grass Is Always Greener on the Other Side, but How Safe Is It

Pesticides.But are the pesticides we are buying from the store truly safe?Some people will likely choose to continue using pesticide products around the home but, please consider some of the following non-toxic pesticide alternatives:.But be careful, boiling water will kill all plants, not just the weeds.All you need to do is spray the vinegar on the plants that you wish to kill or in an area that you would like to repel bugs.If you have an area in which you do not wish to have plants growing at all, salt works well as pet-safe weed control.Sprinkling cornmeal in an area that you want to keep weeds out of will not harm the already established plants but will keep weeds from growing.Fertilizer.There are two types of fertilizers: chemical and organic.The packages for chemical fertilizers tell you what the active ingredients are, such as nitrogen and phosphates.Any number over 13 is most likely derived from urea, even in products labeled "organic.".A safe fertilizer is one that contributes nutrients in a form not harmful to soil organisms.While lawns and gardens are great places for children to play and learn, it’s important to remember they can also have hazards such as chemical fertilizers and pesticides. .

Lawn Fertilizer Dangers: Are They Giving You Cancer?

Lawn Fertilizer Dangers: Are They Giving You Cancer?

Lawn Fertilizer Dangers: Are They Giving You Cancer?

On a beautiful April day, I decided to meet outside with my students at the University of Delaware, where I teach journalism.In the middle of a conversation about agricultural pesticides, a groundskeeper, dressed from feet to neck in a white chemical suit, drove by us on a mower.He wasn’t cutting the grass, though; he was spraying it.“Who’s going to ask him what he’s spraying?” I asked my students.Kraus said he himself had eaten half a gram of the stuff every day for three weeks and felt great.Today, annual sales of 2,4-D have surpassed $300 million worldwide, and it’s found in “weed and feed” products, like Scotts Green Sweep, Ortho Weed B Gon, Salvo, Weedone, and Spectracide.[pullquote] With 80 million home lawns and over 16,000 golf courses, you get close to 50 million acres of cultivated turf in America.Of course, 2,4-D is one of scores of pesticides in use.By 1999, more than two thirds of America’s home lawns had been treated with chemical fertilizers or pesticides—14 million by professional lawn-care companies.A year later, the U.S. General Accounting Office reported that Americans were spraying 67 million pounds of synthetic chemicals on their grass every year, and annual sales of lawn-care pesticides had grown to $700 million.(Why else call a company Lawn Doctor?).Even grass seed comes coated with chemicals.Herbicides like 2,4-D preserve grass but kill weeds like clover.In America’s watersheds, nitrogen runoff is considered among the worst problems for water quality.When Tukey was a kid in the late 1960s, his grandfather hired a biplane to spray his 300 acres of fields in Maine a couple of times a year.The fields were mostly planted with cattle feed, not with crops intended for human consumption.For Tukey, spraying day was a thrill.One of his jobs was tending the grounds of a hospital where he hired university students for the work.Churchill said, “I asked him how anyone in good conscience could be applying pesticides on the grounds of a hospital where there were patients being treated for cancers that could be linked to their exposure to pesticides.“It was devastating,” Tukey told me.In Denver, kids whose yards were treated with pesticides were found to be four times more likely to have soft-tissue cancers than kids whose yards were not.Tukey also learned that exposure to lawn chemicals was particularly alarming for people who spread them for a living.One study showed a threefold increase in lung cancer among lawn-care workers who used 2,4-D; another found a higher rate of birth defects among the children of chemical appliers.Suddenly, something in him burst—the DDT squirting over his grandfather’s fields, the chemicals that he’d sprayed outside the hospital, and now a child in a pile of pesticides.The store wouldn’t sell the stuff if it wasn’t safe, she told Tukey.Tukey said there was.It was time to start weaning his company—and customers—off synthetic chemicals.More than 170 municipalities in Canada have banned lawn pesticides, especially on public spaces like school yards and sports fields.Certainly, switching to a less toxic lawn company can reduce your family’s—and neighbors’—exposure to synthetic chemicals.There is a way to think of your yard as more than a burden that needs to be mowed and weeded.When Tallamy, former chair of the entomology department at the University of Delaware, walks around his yard, he sees things most of us would not.If you study the population numbers for native birds, you’ll find the wood thrush is down 48 percent; the bobwhite, 80 percent; bobolinks, 90 percent.An estimated 72 million birds are killed each year in America by direct exposure to pesticides, a number that does not include baby birds that perish because a parent died from pesticides or birds poisoned by eating contaminated insects or worms.His vision is based on three ideas: If you want more birds, you need more native insects; if you want more native insects, you need more native plants; and if you want more native plants, you need to get rid of—or shrink—your lawn.Tallamy’s prescription: Put in native plants that will make your yard a haven for caterpillars, butterflies, and birds.At the University of Delaware, Tallamy and a team are restoring native species to the campus.Because last year the butterflies were not here, and this year they are.All you have to do is plant them and wait for the butterflies.“Spending money on fertilizer without a soil test is just guessing,” says Paul Tukey.Plant clover with your grass.Cut back on watering.“Weeds need light to grow,” Tukey says.Mix them in water, and spray them on your lawn. .

7 Tips for Lawn Fertilizing Safety |

7 Tips for Lawn Fertilizing Safety |

7 Tips for Lawn Fertilizing Safety |

Read the label first and foremost to know how to use the fertilizer, paying close attention to when to apply it, how much to use and especially how long to wait before allowing people or pets on the lawn.Derived from plant or animal products like worm compost or manure, these increasingly popular fertilizers typically leave lawns safe for immediate use while providing plenty of nitrogen. .

Lawn Care Chemicals: How Toxic Are They?

Lawn Care Chemicals: How Toxic Are They?

Lawn Care Chemicals: How Toxic Are They?

Some 100 million pounds of pesticides are used by homeowners in homes and gardens each year, and concern is growing about the potential hazards associated with their use. .

Fertilizer and Mulch Dangers for Dogs

Fertilizer and Mulch Dangers for Dogs

Fertilizer and Mulch Dangers for Dogs

When in doubt, keep your pets inside while working with some of these common garden or yard additives.Fertilizers come in two types: granules or water-based products (that are directly sprayed onto the lawn).Fertilizers look scary – they often are applied by lawn services with warning signs stating that children and pets should be kept off the grass for at least 72 hours.In actuality, fertilizers are generally pretty benign; in fact, they typically have a wide margin of safety depending on what type of product is used.Most lawn fertilizers contain natural elements (such as nitrogen, potash and phosphorous) — often represented by numbers such as 10:0:40.that generally result in mild gastrointestinal signs (e.g., drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, etc.).If your dog eats some grass that had fertilizer applied to it, it rarely leads to serious poisoning; that said, more serious signs can be seen when the product is directly ingested (i.e., right out of the bag).When appropriately applied or diluted, these chemicals typically wash into the soil after rainfall, resulting in low-risk to dogs.The most important thing is to make sure it’s not a fertilizer that has more dangerous products in it – some may contain iron, which can result in iron poisoning, and less common types may contain very dangerous insecticides such as carbamates or organophosphates.Again, these more dangerous types are rarely seen on the market nowadays but, when in doubt, make sure to keep the garage door locked and these fertilizers out of reach!These organic “meals” are widely utilized as soil amendment products, fertilizer components, or as deer, rabbit and wildlife repellants.), foreign body obstruction (from all the bone meal congealing into a large bowling-ball-like concretion), or even severe pancreatitis (i.e., inflammation of the pancreas).Most types of mulch are benign, but can result in a foreign body if your dog ingests them.While many Internet sites discuss the dangers of cocoa mulch, it’s relatively rare for dogs to be poisoned by it.The severity of clinical signs from chocolate poisoning will depend on how much cocoa mulch is ingested; in general, one or two licks or bites will not cause a problem.Between sun, heat, and rain exposure, the likelihood of poisoning diminishes with time as the smell of chocolate rapidly dissipates.Lock your garage, keep your dog on a leash or supervised when outside, and make sure to store lawn and garden products in secure containers!If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian -- they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets. .

5 Chemicals in Lawn Fertilizer You Want to Avoid

5 Chemicals in Lawn Fertilizer You Want to Avoid

5 Chemicals in Lawn Fertilizer You Want to Avoid

Lawn chemicals are designed to kill weeds and bugs.2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid, or 2,4-D —This weed killer is linked in some studies to increased cancer risk (though it’s not classified as a carcinogen by the EPA).Glyphosate — Glyphosate is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s RoundUp.Atrazine (1,2) — This herbicide is used to control broadleaf weeds.Studies suggest it is an endocrine disruptor, which means that it could alter people’s natural hormonal system.In place of these and other toxic chemicals, use organic means to control pests.Ultimately, the best strategy may be to replace lawns with ground covers, gardens, decorative stones, wood chips, and other materials that require no fertilizers. .

Fertilizer Safety Tips for Pets, Children and Adults

Fertilizer Safety Tips for Pets, Children and Adults

Fertilizer Safety Tips for Pets, Children and Adults

When used according to label directions, fertilizers should cause little concern for human or animal safety, but that can change quickly when important instructions go unread or ignored.All reputable fertilizer products include detailed application and safety information on the label.These label instructions include recommended rates and application methods that help ensure proper use of the product involved.When used improperly or against label guidelines, organic and natural products can be hazardous to people and pets.Avoid applying fertilizers on windy days when products might blow or drift into other areas.Sweep excess fertilizer granules off hard surfaces, such as sidewalks, driveways and curbs, and back onto lawns to prevent runoff into storm water systems and groundwater supplies.Excess fertilizers allowed to run into ponds and waterways may, at a minimum, pollute water or cause algae problems.If you have unusual pets, such as backyard hens or something more exotic, check with your vet for safety guidelines.It's good practice to always keep people and pets out of an area before, during and immediately after fertilizer applications — especially when an herbicide is involved. .

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